Top 4 Regulations Affecting Trucking in 2017

We are talking about ELD Mandate, MC numbers, speed limiters and more. With the new ELD mandate, the regulatory landscape will change altogether.All interstate motor carriers will be required to have their trucks equipped with electronic logging devices by December, and truck drivers will have to switch over to electronic logbooks for their HOS logs. 

Mandate is threatening small businesses which can result in higher freight rates. Let’s have a look at other rules and regulations that could affect trucking industry in 2017. 

1. ELD MANDATE

Any truck driver who’s required to track Hours of Service must do so with an electronic logging device (ELD) by December 16. Some shippers may require the carriers they work with to make the change earlier than that.

The electronic logging device (ELD) rule is intended to help create a safer work environment for drivers, and make it easier, faster to accurately track, manage, and share records of duty status (RODS) data.

2. MC Numbers
In general, companies that do the following are required to have interstate operating authority (MC number) in addition to a DOT number:

  • Operating as for-hire carriers (for a fee or other compensation)
  • Transporting passengers, or arranging for their transport, in interstate commerce
  • Transporting federally regulated commodities or arranging for their transport, in interstate commerce

Once it’s in place, the URS will replace the FMCSA’s old registration system for operating authority, and going forward, all carriers, brokers, and freight forwarders will be identified solely by a DOT number instead of an MC, FF, or MX number.

3. Hours of Service
Some portions of the HOS rules that were introduced in July 2013 were lifted again in 2014. The 2013 rules required 34-hour restarts to include two stretches between 1:00 AM and 5:00 AM, and the restart could be used only once per seven days. Those provisions were suspended, and a study by the FMCSA and Virginia Tech University on the rules’ safety impact will determine whether or not that suspension is permanent.

4. Speed Limiters

The public comment period closed last month on a proposed rule that would require speed limiters on vehicles that weigh more than 26,000 lbs. The FMCSA hasn’t suggested what the top speed on the limiters would be. A large segment of those who participated in the public comment period argued against speed limiters, although some large carriers supported a 65 mph limit.

 The docket, which contains nearly 4,500 comments total, is brimming with comments from truck operators framing the rule as unsafe, overly intrusive and unnecessary. 

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